Advertisements

‘Television on the Internet’

This article and my article next week are the continuation of the story that was introduced with the video for MarketingMadeSimple.tv that appeared on Thursday, June 28th.

The Marketing Made Simple TV icon

The Marketing Made Simple TV icon @ Jeff Ogden

INTRODUCTION TO A LONG FORGOTTEN DREAM
Over 40 years ago, one of my dreams was to become a television interview show host. Not that I liked him but since his was the only show around at the time, I imagined it would be like the show Johnny Carson had. If I look back now, a better choice would have been Dick Cavett. In addition, I find Charlie Rose’s guest fascinating but he tends to interrupt them too much. Bill Maher is vulgar, in my opinion. But then there is Bill Moyers. He is historically the best one of all, guests included, if I had to choose to be part of a show like someone else’s.

That dream went the way of many others that had faded over the years. I forgot because I had accepted the unlikely probability that ‘I’ could ever have a television show. I had also let go of my dream to become a fly fisher-woman. When that became a reality the last two summers in a row, I should have suspected that something was happening to my once forgotten dreams for my life.

MOVING FORWARD
About a year or so ago, I became a blog author for this publications. Shortly before that, I had been writing press releases for the clients of a colleague of mine. I really enjoyed this because I got to know my subjects through personal interviews. I found that I also enjoyed writing from my research.

In another recent development, as The New York Graphic Design Examiner.com, I wrote an entire series of articles on one topic, the Charrette Corporation. It was based completely upon primary source interviews. That was quite fortunate as the company had been sold, the staff was disbanded and the founders, Lionel Spiro and Blair Brown, are no longer young men. A substantial number of former employees were located thanks to an initial contact on LinkedIn, Stephen Dill. In fact, there is a Charrette Alumni Group on LinkedIn and I am the only non-former employee of it. I was admitted as an honorary member because of my Charrette memoir. For this honor, I have founders Jack Skidmore and Mark Levitan to thank.

Alison Gilbert, Media Maven

Alison Gilbert, Media Maven from the show’s intro, Marketing Made Simple TV, filmed by Robert Kothe @ Jeff Ogden

THE MEDIA MAVEN
Writing the Charrette Chronicles crystalized in my mind how much I love researching a topic, conducting interviews and putting the pieces together to make something greater than all its individual parts, a story. An author was born out of all these efforts and my media maven spirit was awakening. So when the next media opportunity arose, as a member of our multi-author blog, I jumped at the chance. It was to assist another blogger, Jeff Ogden with his creation of a ‘Television on the Internet’ show, Marketing Made Simple TV. This was a clear sign that another, more distant dream seemed to be reawakening inside me.

TUNING IN
The show was to begin in the beginning of May 2012. There was a tremendous amount of preparation for it. The show’s creator, Jeff Ogden, would be the host and interviewer. He invited numerous guests, created a preliminary schedule, built a blog site where each video would be post as it aired and there would be a blog post about the guest to accompany it. The site would include additional posts related to the show, About the Show, Becoming a Sponsor and things of that nature.

Jeff Ogden, creator and host of Marketing Made Simple TV

Jeff Ogden, creator and host of Marketing Made Simple TV, ‘Television for the Internet’

ON THE SET
The previous ‘gig’ that Jeff had hosted, ‘Mad Marketing TV’, has some rather unpleasant music and dizzying graphics as its introduction. He decided that had to go on his show. So before I realized what had happened, I was invited to be the ‘real live person’ (as Jeff initially described the change in format) to introduce and close the show. Off I went, with optional outfits and hats in hand, for my green-screen taping. There’s lots more to come. The continuation of this story will appear here next week.

STAY TUNED
Stay tuned to the story of the evolution of a ‘Television on the Internet’ show. In the meantime, you can catch the initial airing of each week’s episode on Thursdays at noon, EDT/NY. After airing, each episode is available for viewing 24/7 on MarketingMadeSimple.tv as posts are on any other blog formatted publication.

SOURCES
Television on the Internet

The Charrette Chronicles

Mad Marketing TV 

Brand Development

INTRODUCTION

Those of us who have been fortunate enough to become authors for the Digital Brand Marketing Education Blog know intimately the four pillars that comprise the edifice of the DBME blog. We know their interrelatedness, their synergy and we continually learn more as the skyrocketing technology raises the roof on the other three pillars.

The charrette apple with white helvetica type and the white compass

Charrette Took on the 'Big Apple' Design Scene @ Charrette Corporation


DIGITAL, BRAND, MARKETING, EDUCATION

A piece of writing can illustrate the interrelatedness between digital technology, branding, marketing and their value as educational tools if seamlessly crafted by a seasoned professional. Basil Puglisi, the founder of DBMEi, expertly summarizes the process, in less a minute, in the above video.

This blog post, Brand Development, will focus primarily on two of the pillars, branding and marketing. Ironically, the emphasis on digital technology is antithetical because the story is about a company that primarily pre-dates the transition from the analog to digital world. Nonetheless, this exploration of branding is a study worth anyone’s attention, those who are ensconced in the digital world and those who know nothing about it.


HOW A BRAND IS DEVELOPED

The charrette 1969 catalog

The Charrette 1969 Catalog @ Charrette Corporation

A brand ultimately needs to become that ‘entity’ by which a company or organization is known and recognized. It can be comprised of visual, verbal, audial and other sensory components. It can start out simple and grow to become more complex. It can start out complex and be simplified. It can also start simple and stay simple, start complex and stay complex. In my opinion, one way is not superior to any other. All that matters is that the end result works.


MY FAVORITE PRE-DIGITAL BRAND

My favorite pre-digital brand is an extraordinary example of simple stays simple. And it did work. For our present day digital technology purposes, there is much to observe and learn from this masterful example. This brand was for a company that existed in the last quarter of the 20th century. It business and products were predominantly pre-digital. The shift to digital did not represent the true spirit of the company or its brand.

charrette bag, stickers etc all showing the brand

The Proof Is In The Brand @ Johanna Bohoy for Charrette Corp.


THE ELEMENTS OF THE BRAND

The basic element was a single color, red. It then grew to include one word of type, charrette. The style was Helvetica and the color was white. The Charrette Corporation was the largest distributor and retailer of design tools in the industries of architecture, graphics, landscaping, interiors, engineering and fashion during its time. Its reach was from New England, south on the East Coast, and west into the Heartland.

The primary source of income from the corporation was the commercial side accounts. The commercial accounts included even various branches of the US government. But the retail side was where Charrette really showed what its brand was made of. The retail side consisted of such an exclusive group of famous clientele, designer, actors, writers, etc. that this ‘sought after’ list is still safely guarded and unpublished to keep the anonymity of this extraordinary group of customers.

The charrette van

The Charrette Van @ Charrette Corporation

THE RESULTS

The brand was so powerful that even when some of the elements were changes over its decades of existence, the integrity was always maintained. One could identify a Charrette store, vehicle, product, and packaging. The impeccable job creating and permeating their brand which embodied an attention to detail and clean, simple lines  reflected its corporate culture and philosophy, spilled over into its marketing and its very soul. This was so well done that I believe customers (myself included) would buy their products not only because of their superior quality but also to own a piece of that brand and to be a part of that amazing culture, its spirit and soul.


IN CONCLUSION

The Charrette Corporation is gone in body but the memories and memorabilia of this brand live on. Charrette was easily able to do extraordinary marketing because of the impeccable attention to detail both in their products and the branding of everything they produced.

The charrette building now

A deserted Charrette building now @ Charrette Corporation

The Charrette culture, their religious approach to quality and attention to detail live on as an extraordinary lesson for all of us who have an interest in brand development and marketing. Digital technology can spread the words (and images) faster than we ever could before. Charrette did not have that advantage. But what they had was something remarkable to share. For the time that Charrette was at the top of its game, it did a job that set the standard for many other industries that I believe has not been surpassed today.

SOURCES

A Fond Farewell to the Charrette Corporation

Brand Development

Finding Your Brand Voice

%d bloggers like this: