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Marketing Made Simple TV: What Are We All About?

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The show’s icon @ MarketingMadeSimple.tv

Since May 17, 2012, viewers have tuned into Marketing Made Simple TV on Thursdays at noon EDT/NY to view guests being interviewed by host, Jeff Ogden. The interviews have been of professionals primarily in the business of social media marketing.

There exists a great deal of information about the show itself. But until now, it has only been in writing on the Marketing Made Simple TV weblog. In other words, there was no video addressing the question, ‘Marketing Made Simple TV: What Are We All About’?

So Jeff decided is was time to answer that question on video. To add a bit of spice to the mix, which we always like to do any way, it was decided that we would do a Q&A format show rather than a solo appearance by Jeff.

Therefore today, as a special treat and surprise, we have a slight shift or twist on the way we do the show. We’ve  given it an extra pinch of zest. Jeff Ogden, the host of the show, has changed seats and become the guest himself.

Producer of the show, Alison Gilbert (that’s me), a veteran interviewer as well as a media maven, jumped at the chance to be the guest host and interview Jeff in the guest’s seat. Alison is the marketing ‘maven in the hat’ who introduces and closes the show each week.

Without further adieu, here is the video of our Q&A session on what Marketing Made Simple TV is all about. On Saturday,  a more in-depth post will appear describing the experience of being the guest host and producer of a show using the latest technology, ‘Television on the Internet’.

Marketing Made Simple with Alison Gilbert from Jeffrey Ogden on Vimeo.

The Value of Video: For Education and Self-Promotion

INTRODUCTION
Video is a great learning tool. YouTube ranks #3 behind Alexa ranked #1 Google as the place to look up ‘how to’ information. But there is another value to video that had not occurred to me until I had the opportunity to participate in the making of a Web TV series, Marketing Made Simple.

This opportunity arose thanks to my Digital Brand Marketing colleague, Jeff Ogden, owner of Find New Customers, the host-interviewer of this weekly Web TV show. I am not even sure exactly how it all came about. But it was decided that a ‘real person’ would make a much more pleasing Intro and Closing for this new show than the kind of graphics and music used on a previous show.

Alison Gilbert introduces Marketing Made Simple in front of Main Street.

Alison Gilbert introduces the ‘Marketing Made Simple’ Web TV show in front of ‘Main Street’.

THE VIDEO SESSION
So there I was, with several outfits in hand along with the general idea for a script, off to the green screen-shooting studio to make the Intro and Closing. I am no newcomer to media or public speaking. I have appeared on TV, both nationally and locally. I have been interviewed dozens of times on the radio. I’ve spent time in the voice-acting studio  and am the ‘star’ in my own business videos. I have taught courses and lectured in-person more times than I can remember. But this was different.

I was representing something other than my own craft and myself. I was there to be the ‘real person’ introducing and closing for a Web TV show on behalf of the host, Jeff Ogden and for each of his weekly professional marketing guests. I had a responsibility to the show itself and to everyone else involved to maintain a standard of professionalism and excellence.

GREEN SCREEN
That made me a little bit nervous. But as many people know, I adore being in front of the camera. The videographer, Robert Kothe, was terrific. He recorded me on ‘green screen’ in a variety of outfits and semi-impromptu monologue. I had the ‘bones’ of a script to use. Certain key word phrases were placed on the teleprompter but  beyond that, I was able to add my own distinct personality to the job.

Within a two-hour period, we had done sufficient takes in three different sets of clothes and a variety of Intros and Closing to call it a day. Then the fun really began. The videographer had a template to use for the background. But the beauty of ‘green screen’ is that one can do just about anything behind the performer. I could have been flying in the clouds, standing in front of a great battle, or anything one could imagine.

Fortunately, my husband, Phil Jacobs, who is both a professional illustrator and photographer, had some great scenes that fit perfectly behind my ‘performance’. I was so excited to see not only how my acting had turned out but also what outfit and background would be used together. It was truly a media adventure.


THE SHOW

The rest is history. The first show aired this past Thursday at noon, with host Jeff Ogden, his guest, Mitch Joel and me, the Marketing Bytes Maven, doing the ‘Intro’ and ‘Closing’ in front of the illustration of Main Street that has come to be synonymous with my Marketing Main Street services for marketing local business.

As Mitch pointed out in his interview, in-person speaking requires some very special skills. While everyone else probably took note of his marketing expertise, I listened intently to every point he made about speaking before an audience rehearsing in my mind for my next opportunity to use my acting skills to help educate others and promote myself as well.

AUTHOR:

Alison Gilbert is a Digital Age Journalist. She is a regular contributing author to DBMEi, writes The Marketing Byte Blog and is The New York Graphic Design Examiner. Alison is the owner of MARKETING BYTES Solutions 4 Local Biz  located on Long Island, New York.
This boutique style – very personal service – hybrid company specializes in helping local/small biz generate sales leads by combining the best of traditional advertising with the latest online marketing technology. Contact Alison Gilbert at info@marketingbytes.biz or call 516-665-9034 EDT/NY/US. MARKETING BYTES serves local/small businesses virtually everywhere.

SOURCES

Freelancing in the Digital Age

A few weeks ago, I read the blog post of one of my colleagues at digitalbrandmarketing.com, Megan Campbell. Her post was titled, Why Twitter is Better Than Facebook for Marketing Yourself as a Freelancer.

It started off like this, “Working as a freelance writer means a lot of self-promotion. Really, working as a freelance anything means a lot of self-promotion. It is up to yourself to get your name and work out there for the world to see. You are, in a sense, a business. Fortunately, in this day, social media gives you the perfect platform for all the free self-promoting you could ask for. I can’t imagine how hard it was to begin a freelance career before the Internet existed.”

Drafting table with graphic design tools

Drafting table with graphic design tools used pre-computer design. © Alison Gilbert

I chuckled to myself not only able to imagine what it would have been like to be a freelancer before the Internet existed but also remembering what it was like. Although I was in the graphic design end of the communications industry, the characteristics of being a freelance writer are similar enough to merit my comparison.

I could not resist sharing my memories. I am slightly paraphrasing my comment about her post. ‘I think your article is excellent. In today’s economy and technology, you are right on the mark.

‘I do want to share with you and your readers what it was like in the 1980′s and early 1990′s to be a freelancer. It was easy! Social media did NOT exist and it was NOT a problem. It fact it was easier then than it is now to have to keep up on every platform where my name, username and password have taken up residence and will likely continue to do so on an almost daily basis as more new platforms pop up.

‘My first year, I had 25 clients. Most of them came to me as warm leads from a women’s group that I belonged to. Quite a few of the women worked at ad agencies. I hardly had to look for work. Granted it was a very different economy from today’s. But perhaps social media has evolved in response to these times and a much more challenging economy. Therefore given the chance for it to still be pre-digital and pre-social media, I would go back to the analog days in a heartbeat.

Designer's desktop© http://www.123rf.com/

‘Don’t get me wrong. I love social media. In fact, I am what we call an addict. Do I also qualify as an evangelist? I never stop talking and preaching about its many merits.

‘But on the other side of the coin is the fact that I now have to think about everything globally rather than just locally. It is a MUCH bigger job. I have met so many people in the two or three years since I joined facebook. I can hardly remember anyone’s name. It may be a part of maturing to feel that life was easier then than it is now. I think it is called reminiscing. But it WAS easier, definitely slower and simpler.

‘I easily made $15 to $20/hour, worked a 5 hour day, took an express bus to and from the client’s office, had my bag of tricks, a tool box the size of a book, not an iPad, my paste-up skills, and my lunch if I was working in an area where I did not know of places to eat. I often got paid very quickly. I could easily make $500/week and in those days that covered my rent. It was mostly a manageable life.

‘If you or anyone else are interested, I am the NY Graphic Design examiner.com. I wrote a series of posts about being a graphic designer before the computer age, through the transition from analog to digital and since the computer. I would love to hear what others think both about what you wrote about today and what I have indicated about how it used to be like compared to what it is like now.’

AUTHOR:

Alison Gilbert is the Digital Age Storyteller. She is a regular contributing author to DBME, writes The Marketing Byte Blog and is The New York Graphic Design Examiner. Alison is the owner of MARKETING BYTES Solutions 4 Local Biz. Located on Long Island, New York, MARKETING BYTES serves clients virtually everywhere.

Their boutique style – very personal service – hybrid company specializes in helping local/small biz generate sales leads by transitioning from traditional advertising to online marketing. Contact MARKETING BYTES at info@marketingbytes.biz or call 516-665-9034 ET

SOURCES
From the NY Graphic Design Examiner


OTHER RESOURCES

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