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Measuring Social Influence – Klout, PeerIndex, SocialIQ and Kred

Nowadays, when a business wants to gauge how the general public feels about their brands, products or services, they are using tools for measuring their social influence on the web. In many cases, some even use them to take a measurement of their competitors. Staying on top of important industry trends, changes in algorithms, and social influence measurement tools can keep you and your business afloat on the web and learning how to make those trends, changes and tools work for you can assist your business in increasing growth, brand visibility, and even your business’s social media ‘voice.’

If you need a reminder of how important those things can be to your social media campaigns, take a look back to the blog, 4 important lessons on brand marketing via Twitter, where we shared the successes that JetBlue, Hilton and more were having from the social media voices they created for themselves. We covered the spread of social influence tools in another past blog titled Klout vs PeerIndex vs SocialIQ at the end of last summer, but how are those tools developing now?

Klout

Klout is still as powerful a force in social influence as ever. Recent updates include some fairly impressive leaps ahead in keeping up with business technology and its impact in the realm of social influence. Just this month Klout announced they would be offering dedicated pages for brands where Klout users will be able to see lists of top influencers for each brand as well as observe social media conversations,  monitor brand developments and even earn access to some special perks. This new update, codenamed “Brand Squad” is launched in a partner venture with Red Bull.

For some more information on where Klout may be headed, don’t forget to check out the video from #SMWSMAC where we had a full panel including Michelle Ross of Klout to explain where we can expect social influence measurement tools to take us in the coming year. Klout still has its naysayers as well. However, it has also begun to be an item of reference now asked for in some job interviews as well. For those working in the social media industry, it may soon become a vital tool on your own list of portfolio and reference links.

PeerIndex

PeerIndex has found itself in continual growth since we delved into it last August. Reebok has just offered the top 100 most influential PeerIndex users, as identified by their own PeerPerks service, a free pair of Reebox’s RealFlex trainers. In promoting their own, “The Sport of Fitness Has Arrived” marketing campaign. The PeerPerks system, hosted on its own microsite, allows users to sign in just as they do on PeerIndex, by using their Facebook or Twitter accounts. Although this particular marketing campaign will focus on those who have influence in fitness, athletics or sports, it seems that a few more brand offers from big names like Reebok may push PeerIndex and their competitive reward system into more growth for their social media influencer user base.

SocialIQ

SocialIQ was just breaking out of the start-up phase when we last covered them. Since then they too have grown into an impressively notable competitor on the social influence circuit. Early on, they had enacted their own series of perks for those who were influential in a variety of industries and the developers at SocialIQ are still continually looking to improve and perfect their relationship with users. Just this past Tuesday they met with a customer service special interest group at Intuit to ask for some feedback on the SocialIQ experience design.

SocialIQ has an aesthetically pleasing and easy to manage user interface in their one click social media network integration with Twitter and Facebook. Developed by Soovox, the algorithm SocialIQ uses seems to be working and measures influence based on the same idea as the others. However, I have noticed that SocialIQ has done some pretty impressive improvements on their site’s look as well as their feedback to users complete with an influence level analysis that tells you which brands you may have the closest affinity with.

Kred

A month ago we covered Kred and what it had to offer as a newer social influence measurement tool on the net in Monitoring Your Social Reputation with Kred.  Just this month Kred has added Facebook to their options for users wanting to measure their social influence scores. Everything seems to be working well so far and with Kred making a major showing at SXSW this year, the company is slowly starting to gain more ground. Kred scores do break down a bit differently as users actually receive points for interactions, tweets, mentions and more, so I would definitely encourage those who have not tried it to do so. It may offer the last piece to the puzzle of your business’s social influence analytics.

Author:

@BasilPuglisi is the Executive Director and Publisher for Digital Brand Marketing Education (dbmei.com). Basil C. Puglisi is also the President of Puglisi Consulting Group, Inc. A Digital Brand Marketing Consultancy that manages professional and personal branding for Fortune 500 CEOs, Hedge Fund Managers and Small Business Owners.

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  1. Reblogged this on txwikinger's blog.

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